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Glossary - D - F
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glossary menu

Every now and then we come across terminology that leaves us scratching our heads as to the meaning of certain acronyms, buzzwords or new IT terms emanating from our friends at Redmond (or Reading!). With this in mind, we've put together a glossary of terms for you to use, print off or cut-n-paste to your desktop which will help you sort out your ASPs (Active Server Pages) from your ASPs (Application Service Provider).
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[A]     [B-C] [D-F] [G-I] [L-M] [O-R]

DDNS Dynymic DNS. DHCP and Windows 2000 (Win2K) clients dynamically update DNS records instead of using the traditional method of manually or programmatically adding the records to (static) DNS zone files.
Delegation The capability whereby a higher administrative authority grants specific rights to groups and individuals.
Dfs Distributed File System (dfs) consists of two components: A service that runs on Windows 2000 (Win2K) servers and a dfs client that runs on client computers. Dfs provides an easy and efficient way for network clients to access files dispersed across a network. A network administrator can configure either a standalone dfs or a domain-based dfs; domain-based dfs offers fault tolerance. A dfs client comes with Win2K, Windows NT, and Windows 98. You can download the dfs client for Win95 from Microsoft. Only NT 4.0 (standalone dfs server) and Win2K (standalone and domain-based server) support the dfs server component.
Dynamic disk A Dynamic disk is a physical disk you can manage only with Win2K Disk Management. A Dynamic disk, which can only contain dynamic volumes that Disk Management created, isn't visible to MS-DOS. Unlike Basic disks, Dynamic disks can't contain partitions or logical drives. You can perform certain tasks on a Dynamic disk only, including creating a simple, spanned, striped, mirrored, or RAID5 volume; extending a simple or spanned volume; repairing a mirrored or RAID5 volume; and reactivating a missing disk. If you decide to convert a Dynamic disk back to a Basic disk, you'll have to remove all the volumes from the Dynamic disk first.
EFS Encrypting File System (EFS) lets users encrypt files and folders so intruders can’t view their confidential data. EFS automatically generates an encryption key pair for users so they can transparently encrypt files or folders. Encryption is a new NTFS attribute in Windows 2000 (Win2K). You can use either Windows Explorer or a command-line tool called CIPHER to encrypt or decrypt files. The default encryption level that EFS provides is 56 bit; in North America, users can use 128-bit encryption with the Enhanced CryptoPAK, which you can order from Microsoft.
Fortezza Fortezza represents a series of security products that include serial port devices, PC cards, server boards, and combination cards such as Fortezza/Modem and Fortezza/Ethernet. The US Department of Defense uses Fortezza for hardware-based cryptography. You can use a Fortezza cryptography card to make secure connections to Fortezza-enabled Web sites. Before you make such a connection, you need a Fortezza cryptography card, a Fortezza cryptography card reader, and the appropriate software drivers from the card-reader vendor. You also have to enable the Use Fortezza option in Internet Explorer (IE) 5.0.





















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